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Cortisol Awakening Response among Women Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

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dc.contributor.author Pinto, R. J.
dc.contributor.author Correia-Santos, P.
dc.contributor.author Costa-Leite, J.
dc.contributor.author Levendosky, A.
dc.contributor.author Jongenelen, I.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-19T11:24:14Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-19T11:24:14Z
dc.date.issued 2016-08-24
dc.identifier.citation Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2016 Dec;74:57-64. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.08.024. Epub 2016 Aug 25. en_US
dc.identifier.other doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11933/642
dc.description.abstract The studies of the effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on the cortisol awakening response (CAR) are scarce and contradictory. While some of the studies suggested that female victims of IPV showed high CAR, other studies found low CAR. Mixed results may be related to differences in sample characteristics as well as other potential covariates associated with the cortisol, as femalés history of abuse, chronicity, severity and type of IPV, psychological distress, posttraumatic stress disorder, and social support. The study examined individual differences in CAR among 149 female victims of severe IPV reported to authorities, including 76 (51%) living in shelter and 73 (49%) living with the abusive partners. Results revealed several individual differences in CAR that may contribute to understanding the mixed results found in literature, including women with cortisol that decreased between the baseline and 30min later, women with no increase of cortisol, and women whose cortisol increased above baseline. Additionally, women without CAR experienced more chronic and severe violence, more psychological distress and PTSD symptoms. However, hierarchical multiple regression indicated that chronic severe violence was the only independent variable that significantly explained 13% of the variance in CAR, even after including all covariates in the model, and adjusting for sociodemographic variables. In conclusion, this study suggests that the HPA axis dysregulation is influenced by chronic severe violence among women victims of IPV. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine en_US
dc.subject en_US
dc.title Cortisol Awakening Response among Women Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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